Monday, December 27, 2010

White River Development Association - Part 3

Now...The Railroad Men.

 K. V. Loba, President of the Ozarks Railroad Company,
hurrying construction into Mountain Home.

K. V. Loba, President of the Ozarks Railroad Company, that will soon build a road through this section of the state, and through Mtn. Home and Baxter county, has made the possible the realization of a dream of the people in this section of 50 years. Mr. Loba portrays a character alive with determination, stickability, and confidence. He was raised a neighbor to the people of this county, having spent his childhood in Ozark county, Missouri. He saw the road he is building now with a boy’s mind, 29 years ago. He also is realizing a dream. The railroad when fully completed will run from Springfield to Little Rock, through the richest undeveloped section of the United States.
End.

Conductor Bill Jones holding 209 for Time at Pine Top.

This is not a good picture of Bill. It does not do him justice. He is far better looking than our artist has shown not having a photograph however, this is the best that we can do. You will know him by his length. The other conductors on the White river passenger have been stunted. He has been punching tickets on the division for a good many years. In fact we cannot remember when he wasn’t. He has an optimistic personality that is marked with a spirit of geniality, friendliness and strict subservice to his duty. In politics he is a Bull Mooser first, last and all the time, and one of the staunchest supporters the irresistible Teddy had in the White river country during the last campaign. He has a charming family and lives in Joplin.
End.
C. C. Feemster, Immigration Agent for the 
Ozarks Railroad company, as the Pied Piper,
piping new settlers into Baxter county.
C. C. Feemster, Immigration Agent for the Ozarks Railroad company, occupied one of the most important positions with the concern. He is a man that the company depends on to bring new settlers into its territory, and his past record can be taken as a criterion of what he will do here. Baxter county will be several times in population within the next few years what it is now. Mr. Feemster comes from Gentry, in Benton county, this state, and was an important factor in making that county one of the wealthiest and most prosperous in the state. Already hundreds of inquiries are pouring in on him for information on Baxter county, he is carrying on an extensive advertising campaign, which will be expanded as work progresses.
End.

Clyde Miller, passenger conductor of the White river division,
as he would have appeared during the flood 
if he could have gotten hold of the motive power pictured above.

Clyde always gets through if there is a ghost of a show. Our artist caught his likeness during the big overflow in the White river last week. You will notice the pained, determined expression on his face. It is the same kind of expression every man on the division was wearing at the time. It is not a normal likeness of Mr. Miller. Clyde miller has seen all the ups and downs on the division since the first trains began to awaken the echoes in the mountains and along the route. He is a little short on stature but makes up for it in optimism. He walks with a springy step, is congenial, knows his duties from the first to the last letter in the alphabet and adheres to them. He has a large acquaintanceship over the White river country and numbers his friends by the score. He is a believer in the country through which he works, yes sir, a real believer, and is always willing to back that belief with a little money when anything real good bobs up and has been a factor in the development of the country. He lives in Joplin.
End.
 
J. E. Featherstone, Superintendent of Bridges and Building 
on the White river Division.
 J. E. Featherstone is among one of the oldest men from the point of service on the White river division, and carries one of the most important duties of the division on his shoulders. He has to keep things up in ship shape order. More than any of the rest of us in White river country he likes to see fair weather, for bad weather means slides and washouts. He is rather reticent in disposition but warms up on acquaintance and is chuck full of interesting railroad data and lore. He lives at Aurora, Superintendent Hickey’s village, and is head of a family as interesting as himself. This picture of Mr. Featherstone is published with apologies to his wife.
End.
Mike Farrell, roadmaster of the White river division, 
moving a slide during recent flood on the White river.

Mike Farrell is one of the best known men on the White river road. He is well known because he is an optimist, a hale fellow, well met, with an aptitude of making friends. If Mike ever had a grouch no one ever caught him with it. Mike’s personality is probably best expressed in the way he keeps his part of the road, and his domicile. His office and quarters are established in a boxcar bungalow, in the yards at Batesville. This is not like the others of the same type. It is neatly painted, and surrounded with a well kept lawn dotted here and there with beds of choice of flowers. Mike is Irish, and Sh! Don’t tell the girls, he’s a widower.
End.

Jerry Butterfield, a landscape artist for I. M. and S. and Mo. Pac. Railroads. 
This picture portrays Jerry, rendering a simple melody, "Smother Me with Kisses,"
on the player piano in the lobby of the Taneycomo Club at Hollister, Mo., 
on the White river division.

Jerry Butterfield is a popular personality on the White river division, especially around the little summer resort of Hollister-on-White-river. He is a Missouri product, originating at Lee’s Summit. His physique is characterized by length and his personality by art. Every section of Jerry’s anatomy runs to distance. He is long perpendicularly, as are all of his appendages. He has a long chin, long nose, long hands, long fingers and long feet. He also has a long brain, a soul for music, and an eye for aesthetic beauty. Jerry follows his profession not only for the simoleon. 
End. 
H. U. Barton, agent at Norfork, handling 
a 2000 word special to Arkansas Gazette.

H. U. Barton, agent at Norfork, has become a fixture in the town citizenship, and is an enthusiastic booster for his town and White river country. As an operator and agent Mr. Barton holds all records on the White river division from th e point of years at the key.  He is 53 years old and was born in a depot on the Grand Trunk in Canada, where his father was an agent and operator. He learned the key when he learned his a, b, c’s, and took charge of his first station when he was 17 years old. His mother and sisters were also operators. He came from Kansas City Southern to the White river division. Everybody like Barton and he won his circle of friends by his please and friendly personality and the courteous treatment he has accorded them.
End. 


Al Rice, one of the three popular 
passenger conductors on the White river division.

Al Rice is one of the oldest conductors on the White river division, having been punching tickets ever since it has been a division. He is rotund, doughy and jocular and what he lacks inn height he make up in ability, girth and congeniality. He has an antipathy toward other professions except railroading. The smell of the coal smoke, the screeching locomotive and the lurching coaches have captured him for life. Among his other characteristics he is a strong booster for the White river country and never loses an opportunity to speak a good word for it. He lives in Joplin, and makes the round trip twice a week.
End.

Next Post...The Newspaper Men.

Works Cited:
The Great and the Near Great in the White River Country - H. U. Barton.” The Baxter Bulletin 14.32 (Aug. 13, 1915) 1. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2008.
“The Great and the Near Great in the White River Country - Jerry Butterfield.” The Baxter Bulletin 14.19 (May 14, 1915) 1. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2008.
“The Great and the Near Great in the White River Country – Mike Farrell.” The Baxter Bulletin 14.39 (Oct. 1, 1915) 1. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2008.
“The Great and the Near Great in the White River Country – J. E. Featherstone.” The Baxter Bulletin 14.33 (Aug. 20, 1915) 1. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2008.
“The Great and the Near Great in the White River Country - C. C. Feemster.” The Baxter Bulletin 14.36 (Sept. 10, 1915) 1. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2008.
The Great and the Near Great in the White River Country - Bill Jones.” The Baxter Bulletin 14.31 (Aug. 6, 1915) 1. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2008.
“The Great and the Near Great in the White River Country - K. V. Loba.” The Baxter Bulletin 14.29 (July 23, 1915) 1. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2008.
 “The Great and the Near Great in the White River Country - Clyde Miller.” The Baxter Bulletin 14.35 (Sept. 3, 1915) 1. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2008.
“The Great and the Near Great in the White River Country - Al Rice.” The Baxter Bulletin 14.21 (May 28, 1915) 1. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2008.

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