Monday, December 27, 2010

White River Development Association - Part 3

Now...The Railroad Men.

 K. V. Loba, President of the Ozarks Railroad Company,
hurrying construction into Mountain Home.

K. V. Loba, President of the Ozarks Railroad Company, that will soon build a road through this section of the state, and through Mtn. Home and Baxter county, has made the possible the realization of a dream of the people in this section of 50 years. Mr. Loba portrays a character alive with determination, stickability, and confidence. He was raised a neighbor to the people of this county, having spent his childhood in Ozark county, Missouri. He saw the road he is building now with a boy’s mind, 29 years ago. He also is realizing a dream. The railroad when fully completed will run from Springfield to Little Rock, through the richest undeveloped section of the United States.
End.

Conductor Bill Jones holding 209 for Time at Pine Top.

This is not a good picture of Bill. It does not do him justice. He is far better looking than our artist has shown not having a photograph however, this is the best that we can do. You will know him by his length. The other conductors on the White river passenger have been stunted. He has been punching tickets on the division for a good many years. In fact we cannot remember when he wasn’t. He has an optimistic personality that is marked with a spirit of geniality, friendliness and strict subservice to his duty. In politics he is a Bull Mooser first, last and all the time, and one of the staunchest supporters the irresistible Teddy had in the White river country during the last campaign. He has a charming family and lives in Joplin.
End.
C. C. Feemster, Immigration Agent for the 
Ozarks Railroad company, as the Pied Piper,
piping new settlers into Baxter county.
C. C. Feemster, Immigration Agent for the Ozarks Railroad company, occupied one of the most important positions with the concern. He is a man that the company depends on to bring new settlers into its territory, and his past record can be taken as a criterion of what he will do here. Baxter county will be several times in population within the next few years what it is now. Mr. Feemster comes from Gentry, in Benton county, this state, and was an important factor in making that county one of the wealthiest and most prosperous in the state. Already hundreds of inquiries are pouring in on him for information on Baxter county, he is carrying on an extensive advertising campaign, which will be expanded as work progresses.
End.

Clyde Miller, passenger conductor of the White river division,
as he would have appeared during the flood 
if he could have gotten hold of the motive power pictured above.

Clyde always gets through if there is a ghost of a show. Our artist caught his likeness during the big overflow in the White river last week. You will notice the pained, determined expression on his face. It is the same kind of expression every man on the division was wearing at the time. It is not a normal likeness of Mr. Miller. Clyde miller has seen all the ups and downs on the division since the first trains began to awaken the echoes in the mountains and along the route. He is a little short on stature but makes up for it in optimism. He walks with a springy step, is congenial, knows his duties from the first to the last letter in the alphabet and adheres to them. He has a large acquaintanceship over the White river country and numbers his friends by the score. He is a believer in the country through which he works, yes sir, a real believer, and is always willing to back that belief with a little money when anything real good bobs up and has been a factor in the development of the country. He lives in Joplin.
End.
 
J. E. Featherstone, Superintendent of Bridges and Building 
on the White river Division.
 J. E. Featherstone is among one of the oldest men from the point of service on the White river division, and carries one of the most important duties of the division on his shoulders. He has to keep things up in ship shape order. More than any of the rest of us in White river country he likes to see fair weather, for bad weather means slides and washouts. He is rather reticent in disposition but warms up on acquaintance and is chuck full of interesting railroad data and lore. He lives at Aurora, Superintendent Hickey’s village, and is head of a family as interesting as himself. This picture of Mr. Featherstone is published with apologies to his wife.
End.
Mike Farrell, roadmaster of the White river division, 
moving a slide during recent flood on the White river.

Mike Farrell is one of the best known men on the White river road. He is well known because he is an optimist, a hale fellow, well met, with an aptitude of making friends. If Mike ever had a grouch no one ever caught him with it. Mike’s personality is probably best expressed in the way he keeps his part of the road, and his domicile. His office and quarters are established in a boxcar bungalow, in the yards at Batesville. This is not like the others of the same type. It is neatly painted, and surrounded with a well kept lawn dotted here and there with beds of choice of flowers. Mike is Irish, and Sh! Don’t tell the girls, he’s a widower.
End.

Jerry Butterfield, a landscape artist for I. M. and S. and Mo. Pac. Railroads. 
This picture portrays Jerry, rendering a simple melody, "Smother Me with Kisses,"
on the player piano in the lobby of the Taneycomo Club at Hollister, Mo., 
on the White river division.

Jerry Butterfield is a popular personality on the White river division, especially around the little summer resort of Hollister-on-White-river. He is a Missouri product, originating at Lee’s Summit. His physique is characterized by length and his personality by art. Every section of Jerry’s anatomy runs to distance. He is long perpendicularly, as are all of his appendages. He has a long chin, long nose, long hands, long fingers and long feet. He also has a long brain, a soul for music, and an eye for aesthetic beauty. Jerry follows his profession not only for the simoleon. 
End. 
H. U. Barton, agent at Norfork, handling 
a 2000 word special to Arkansas Gazette.

H. U. Barton, agent at Norfork, has become a fixture in the town citizenship, and is an enthusiastic booster for his town and White river country. As an operator and agent Mr. Barton holds all records on the White river division from th e point of years at the key.  He is 53 years old and was born in a depot on the Grand Trunk in Canada, where his father was an agent and operator. He learned the key when he learned his a, b, c’s, and took charge of his first station when he was 17 years old. His mother and sisters were also operators. He came from Kansas City Southern to the White river division. Everybody like Barton and he won his circle of friends by his please and friendly personality and the courteous treatment he has accorded them.
End. 


Al Rice, one of the three popular 
passenger conductors on the White river division.

Al Rice is one of the oldest conductors on the White river division, having been punching tickets ever since it has been a division. He is rotund, doughy and jocular and what he lacks inn height he make up in ability, girth and congeniality. He has an antipathy toward other professions except railroading. The smell of the coal smoke, the screeching locomotive and the lurching coaches have captured him for life. Among his other characteristics he is a strong booster for the White river country and never loses an opportunity to speak a good word for it. He lives in Joplin, and makes the round trip twice a week.
End.

Next Post...The Newspaper Men.

Works Cited:
The Great and the Near Great in the White River Country - H. U. Barton.” The Baxter Bulletin 14.32 (Aug. 13, 1915) 1. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2008.
“The Great and the Near Great in the White River Country - Jerry Butterfield.” The Baxter Bulletin 14.19 (May 14, 1915) 1. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2008.
“The Great and the Near Great in the White River Country – Mike Farrell.” The Baxter Bulletin 14.39 (Oct. 1, 1915) 1. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2008.
“The Great and the Near Great in the White River Country – J. E. Featherstone.” The Baxter Bulletin 14.33 (Aug. 20, 1915) 1. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2008.
“The Great and the Near Great in the White River Country - C. C. Feemster.” The Baxter Bulletin 14.36 (Sept. 10, 1915) 1. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2008.
The Great and the Near Great in the White River Country - Bill Jones.” The Baxter Bulletin 14.31 (Aug. 6, 1915) 1. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2008.
“The Great and the Near Great in the White River Country - K. V. Loba.” The Baxter Bulletin 14.29 (July 23, 1915) 1. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2008.
 “The Great and the Near Great in the White River Country - Clyde Miller.” The Baxter Bulletin 14.35 (Sept. 3, 1915) 1. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2008.
“The Great and the Near Great in the White River Country - Al Rice.” The Baxter Bulletin 14.21 (May 28, 1915) 1. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2008.

Saturday, December 18, 2010

White River Development Association - Part 2

The following pictures & articles came out of the 1915 The Baxter Bulletin; they were scanned from microfilm. As a warning, newspapers are not scanned for beauty & quality; the microfilm is for historical archiving. Therefore, some pictures in the next few blogs are not picture masterpieces for quality framing. I have tried to clean, sharpen, and enhance the pictures shown, but some are still contrary.  Below each cartoon is a brief paragraph biography in which I have also printed. These articles were a spin off idea from the Satuerday Evening Post. Some of these old drawings are from Francesca Posey Shiras & Clyde Wolf .  I hope you will enjoy looking back on the Pioneers of Progress of our Ozarks' History.

In this post, we will discover three assets of the White River area & the White River Development Association.
#1. The Association Meetings
#2. The Land.
#3. The Doctors.
The White River Development Association decending on Ruddels last
Thursday for their midsummer meeting.
You will recognize the snare drum player by his springy step as E. J. Loop of Cotter. The man who is doing heavy work on the bass, is A. A. Webber, sec. of the association of Batesville. The next in line who is tearing off a few strains on the snareette is Austin Wilkinson, of the Batesville Guard, and the color bearer on the extreme right as our old friend Bill Williamson. All in all you will recognize this entire group as being the biggest bunch of booster in the state. They have “PEP.” Pep is the concentrated essence of progressiveness. If you haven’t got it yet, attend the next meeting and become inoculated.

The meeting Thursdays at Ruddells, was a typical meeting of the association. J. R. Case and family were hosts of the big party but they were fully big enough to get away with it. Between 400 and 500 people attended from all sections of the White River Country. A big dinner was spread in the new canning factory building, and it was a good dinner, yes sir, a good dinner. The Boy Scouts from Newport were there with their band, and made plenty of harmonious noise. The speakers of the day were Mr. Coffin of Batesville, Junius Case, A. A. Webber, Wm. Oldfield and H. D. Routzong. It was one of the most enthusiastic meetings that was held. We think our artist Clyde Wolf of Norfork, has done justice to the spirit of the occasion.
End

The White River Development Association was considered an "Engine of Progress" that fit smoothly in the The Hand of  Opportunity. Double click on the map below and consider what were considered the major land & transportation assets of Baxter County, Arkansas.
      Baxter County Map - Ozarks Railroad.

Next, we come to a revered group of men for their time.
The Doctors.

Dr. Jim Tipton on a popular professional call.
The country doctor does quite a wonderful work in his limited territory as a physician with worldwide reputation. He does more than practice and fills more than a physicians place. He is one of the throbs in the heartbeat of a community. He is father confessor, advisor, friend, and doctor all combined into one. He is one of every family. He is the poorest paid and the most appreciated when his services are needed.

Dr. Jim Tipton who has practiced in Mtn. Home and surrounding territory the past decade and in Boone and Marion counties before that, has passed all vicissitudes of a country doctor, and sits contently on the top rung of his profession. He is an Arkansas product, the son of Col. Tipton, former state treasure.

Doc is one of those rare personalities among his profession, that carries an air of congeniality and confidence into a sick room, that really does as much good as medicine. Doc goes the gaits, the gaits of a country doctor. No night is too stormy, too hot or too cold for him to ride to the bed of a patient at the other end of the county; and he is never too tired. He is associated in his practice here with Dr. Will Tipton, his brother.
End


Dr. Z. T. Sheid of Norfork, making a popular professional call.
Dr. Z. T. Sheid of Norfork has been practicing medicine in Baxter County for a good many years, and is one of the best known physicians in the south part of the county.  Friends of Doc say he was born and raised in Izard County.  Like all other products of Izard, he is all wool and a yard wide. In the above cartoon our artist depicts some of his professional spirit.  He isn't a lagger; he moves.  He has a congenial, sympathetic personality, and stands right in line for the things that are right, and enjoys a good practice in his community.
End

Dr. H. A. Hackler of Gassville, on a professional call.
Dr. Hackler is a well known figure around the little town of Gassville, having resided there since he began to practice nearly a decade ago. Doc's personality is marked by a complacent evenness, which accounts for his success. Doc never gets ruffled or excited. Just the same old Doc 365 days a year. His practice is a large one in a large scope of territory around his town. Besides being a rattling good physician, he is a rattling good citizen, being possessed with progressive ideas, and is always found behind any move to make Baxter County a bigger county from a moral, progressive, and business stand point.
End
 
Next Week...The Railroad Men.

Works Cited:
“The Great and the Near Great in the White River Country - Dr, Hackler.” The Baxter Bulletin 14.41 (Oct. 22, 1915) 1. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2008.

“The Great and the Near Great in the White River Country - Dr. Tipton.” The Baxter Bulletin 14.18 (May 7, 1915) 1. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2008.

“The Great and the Near Great in the White River Country - Meeting.” The Baxter Bulletin 14.30 (July 30, 1915) 1. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2008.

“The Great and the Near Great in the White River Country - Dr. Sheid.” The Baxter Bulletin 14.37 (Sept. 17, 1915) 1. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2008.

“The Hand of  Opportunity.” The Baxter Bulletin 14.25 (June 25, 1915) 1. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2008.

Monday, December 13, 2010

White River Development Association - Part 1

A Little Background
Looking at the present surroundings & advancements of the Ozarks, one can tend to forget those who have laid the foundation for progress & success. One such group was the White River Development Association established in the early 1900's.

Haven’t heard of the White River Development Association?
Haven’t heard of a W. R. D. A. Booster?
Neither had I until about two years ago; that’s when I saw articles and the art work of the association from 1915 in The Baxter Bulletin. This association had members who came from Ozark and Taney counties in Missouri and Baxter, Boone, Fulton, Izard, and Marion counties in Arkansas. These are some of the forgotten pioneers that have paved our way in business & progress.

The White River Development Association must be given credit for boosting the awareness, ability, and potential in trumpeting the natural resources of the Ozarks, such as:
  • The White River
  • Manganese
  • Mable
  • Limestone
  • Zinc
  • Cedar
  • Railroad Staves
  • Mussel Shells
  • Cotton
  • Cotton Seed

(As a side note...look at this picture.   Read into the picture.   12 White Progressives & 
1 Black Cook. Makes one think wonder. What progressive ideas were talked about at that table?    I digress...) 
 
The desire of the association was for the Federal Government to install 7 locks and dams for transportation, electricity, and flood control. They were also looking to add more railroads, bridges, and improved access to ferry crossings and steamboat landings. 



Work Cited:
"For Hurried Readers." The Harrison Times. Harrison, Arkansas. (Jan. 29, 1916) 13. Access Newspaper Archive.  Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 2 Nov. 2010.


“The Great and the Near Great in the White River Country.” The Baxter Bulletin 15.24 (June 30, 1916) 4. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2008.

Monday, December 6, 2010

Indian Disturbances on the White River

Here is an early reference to the Ozarks from an 1824 newspaper.  Though I have had complaints in the past about posting such items.  It is still a part of our Ozarks' History...warts and all.  May we never forget our past and the lessons it entails.

We learn, by gentlemen from Batesville, that the most serious alarm exists among the citizens above that place, on White river, inconsequence of the disorderly movements of the Shawnees, Delawares, and other Indian tribes, who have been removed to that section of our territory the last two or three years. Some of the old and friendly chiefs have given notice to the white inhabitants, that they cannot restrain the ardor of their headstrong young men, who are resolutely bent on murdering the whites, and the strongest apprehensions are entertained by them that they will very soon carry their savage designs into effect. Two or three old and respectable chiefs, finding the efforts unavailing to maintain peace on the part of the young and refractory men of their nation, we understand, have actually removed from the country, and are returning to their former-residence.

The white people, as may well be supposed, are panic struck. Some have already left their habitations and
improvements, and many others are preparing to leave as soon as possible; and it is the opinion of some of the most intelligent men in Independence county, that the country above Batesville will soon be abandoned to the Indians, unless some efficient measures are promptly adopted to secure our unprotected citizens from the aggression of their savage neighbors.

The General Assembly of this Territory have, for years past, petitioned the general government for the establishment of a military post on White River, which they considered indispensable to the security of
the inhabitants in that quarter; and recent events show that their fears were not without foundation. Indeed, it is the opinion of many, that, since such a multitude of Indians of various nations, roost of whom were arrayed against the United States during the late war with England, have been collected together in the northwest section of our territory, a military post on White river, is as necessary as at almost any other point on the western frontier. The assurance, contained in Mr. Conway's letter, that the Indians on White river shall be removed north of the limits of our territory, will, we sincerely hope, speedily be realized.

Work Cited:
"More Indian Disturbances." The Torch Light And Public Advertiser. Hagers-Town, Maryland. (June 15, 1824) 1. Access Newspaper Archive.  Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 2 Nov. 2010.

Wednesday, December 1, 2010

Jack Thrasher - Snake Killer

Here's a fun little story out of my "Ozark Animal Oddities" File.
Jack Thrasher, a well-known farmer who lives near Arkana, is claiming to be the champion snake killer of Baxter county. He killed 35 snakes with one stone on Big creek one day last week and only threw once. So fa no one has come forward to dispute his title. Coming up the creek he saw an old water moccasin lying in the sun on a rock. Mr. Thrasher picked up a good sized stone, and with the accuracy of Ty Cobb, let drive, striking the old snake midway between the tail and the head. After the smoke had cleared and the squirming stopped, he held a postmortem. He counted about 34 small snakes about 7 inches long and one large one which measured about three feet.

Work Cited:
“Jack Thrasher, Champion Snake Killer, 35 in One Throw.” The Baxter Bulletin 15.38 (Sept. 24, 1915) 1. Baxter County Microfilm Archive. Donald W. Reynolds Library, Mountain Home, AR. 15 Nov., 2010.